Hannaway-Blacksmith

Hannaway Blacksmith History

William H. Hannaway opened his first blacksmith shop in a lean-to which was located on the west side of the Moffett Mill, an 1812 structure down the street from Hearthside. In 1901, Hannaway purchased a former carriage house across from Hearthside to conduct his blacksmithing business. He and his wife eventually built a house on the property as well. The blacksmithing business was quite successful, but with the advent of the automobile, there was less and less demand for his trade. In the 1920’s, he closed his smithy, doing only part-time work for the horse-riding academy which was located at the Butterfly House next door and sharpening tools for neighbors.
Hannaway was a large and powerful man who enjoyed his profession. Most of his work involved shoeing horses and setting wheels for carts and wagons. He was easily able to pick up the horses’ legs. If any horse gave him a problem, he took it as a personal challenge to shoe it. While working, he would often attract a small crowd. Children especially enjoyed watching him. Hannaway was an amiable and pleasant man, and he kept up a constant conversation while on the job.

Hannaway passed away in 1942, but one of his daughters, Cecilia Lee and her husband, purchased the house. The blacksmith shop stood abandoned for more than 40 years and fell into disrepair. In 1985, Mrs. Lee donated it to the Town of Lincoln. The building was dismantled, moved to its current location on the 100-acre Chase Farm, and fully restored.
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