Other Sites

Other Great Road Sites

The Moshassuck Valley District

Called "Great" because it was so much more substantial than other routes through the valley, Great Road was built in 1683 as the major thoroughfare on the west side of the Blackstone River. With historic houses, farms and mills, the Great Road Historic District in Lincoln, retains much of the Blackstone River Valley's early 19th century rural character.

Visit Chase Farm Park

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Over 80 acres of picturesque hills and meadows depict the rural and open character of the Great Road Historic District. Originally a dairy farm that operated from 1867-1965, Chase Farm was Lincoln’s last operating dairy farm and is now enjoyed for a wide range of recreational uses and historic reenactments. The park includes a pond and a butterfly garden and is ideal for the study of the environment, science or interpretation for arts or literature.

A one-room schoolhouse, the 1850 Pullen Corner Schoolhouse, was relocated to the historic Chase Farm Park by the town, and is symbolic of Lincoln’s early education system. Because its original location had no safe access to it and therefore not used, it was in danger of being lost forever. Its new location at Chase Farm Park ensures a bright future as a compliment to telling the stories of our 19th century community. Friends of Hearthside will serve as stewards and coordinate programming as an enhancement to tours at Hearthside, Hannaway Shop and Chase Farm Park.

The Chase Farm House (c. 1890) is located within Chase Farm Park and is also owned by the town. Originally the home to three generations of the Chase family while operating the Chase Farm, the house had fallen into disrepair following years of being vacant following its purchase in 1987. In 2015, the house was restored and has now returned to its original use as a private residence, thanks to an arrangement with Preserve Rhode Island and the Town of Lincoln. 

Moffett Mill

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This 1812 mill is a rare example of a wooden mill built during the first wave of industrialization in the Blackstone Valley and is considered the first wooden machine shop constructed in Rhode Island. Its precarious position on a treacherous curve along Great Road prohibits foot traffic or parking, so it is opened for visitation only during large-scale events when shuttle transportation is available.

Arnold House (1693)

In 1693, Eleazer Arnold, a major landowner, built his house along Great Road, one of the earliest roads in the colonies. Two stories high, the home so dominated the modest dwellings of nearby farmers that it earned the title "Eleazer's Splendid Mansion." With its massive chimney end wall, the house is a rare survivor of a once-common Rhode Island building type known as a stone-ender. Located at 487 Great Road and managed by Historic New England. Open every weekend.

Saylesville Meeting House (1703)

One of the oldest continuously-used Quaker meeting houses in New England and the first house of worship erected in Northern Rhode Island. See the original stepping stone used for dismounting off a horse as well as the historic cemetery behind the meeting house where Hearthside's builder, Stephen Hopkins Smith is buried. Located at 374 Great Road. Open Sunday mornings for worship and for public viewing on the third Saturday morning each month. 

Valentine Whitman Jr. House (1694)

Another classic stone-ender, the Whitman House is the site of the first town meeting in Smithfield. The Whitmans were among the first settlers in Northern Rhode Island. The house, which is furnished, is located at 1147 Great Road at the corner of Whalen Drive. It is opened on occasion for tours and events as well as in September in collaboration with the other Great Road sites for Museum Day.

Lincoln Woods State Park (1908)

It was at Hearthside that the vote was taken by the Metropolitan Park System on Feb. 12, 1908 to purchase Quinsnicket Park as Rhode Island’s first state park. The decision to name it after Abraham Lincoln came about since the meeting was held on his birthday. Today, this 458 acre park located off Great Road is a great place to enjoy many different kinds of outdoor activities offered by the RI Department of Environmental Management, including swimming, picnicking, walking, paddling, rock climbing, and biking.

Kelly House (1835)

Located along the Blackstone River on the Bike Path, this small museum presents the stories of the beginnings of the Blackstone Canal and transportation in the early 19th century. Stephen Hopkins Smith, who built Hearthside, was a Commissioner of the Blackstone Canal and was integral in its development. Open daily April-October.

North Gate (1807)

An original toll house along Louisquisset Pike, which had been built to take traffic off Great Road, is the home to the Blackstone Valley Historical Society. The Arnold Bakery building (1874) was relocated to the site as well. It is open for meetings and programs sponsored by the Society. Located at 1873 Old Louisquisset Pike.
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